Automakers are frequently criticized for not putting concept cars and various one-offs created for concours events into production, or not putting them in production as they appeared on the stage. This has been true for as long as manufacturers have shown their concepts to the public. But every once in a while an actual concept car or design exercise makes the leap from the full-size running prototype to an actual car that someone can buy. And not just in a single copy.

Nissan will do just that by building 50 examples of the Nissan GT-R50 by Italdesign, which was unveiled earlier this year at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in the U.K., created as the ultimate expression of the GT-R for the model's 50th anniversary next year. In fact, the car's exterior will be virtually unchanged from the coupe that was shown at Goodwood earlier this year, based on the GT-R Nismo and styled in collaboration with Pininfarina. But with a couple of exceptions: Customers will be able to pick their own colors for their GT-R50, even though the Goodwood example was finished in a special gray color with gold accents, and customers will also be able to specify interior options.

"The reaction from Nissan fans around the world – and potential customers of the GT-R50 – has greatly exceeded our expectations," said Bob Laishley, Nissan global sports car program director. "These 50 cars, which celebrate 50 years of the GT-R as well as 50 years of Italdesign, will be rolling tributes to Nissan's engineering leadership and rich sports car heritage for a long time to come."

The price for owning one of these 50 machines will be proportional to their rarity and technical ability: Nissan says that each will start at 990,000 euros, which translates to about $1,130,000 before options and various taxes, depending on country.

That's a bit of a bargain compared to how much it would cost for an Italian carrozzeria to reskin a GT-R that you gave them for a one-off, but not by much. Still, we have a feeling that all 50 examples will find homes pretty fast, and hopefully it won't be the kind of collectible that will stay locked in a climate-controlled garage and be taken out to do a couple exercise miles and fluid changes. There are already enough of those.

Source: Autoweek

December 7, 2018