Ares Design seemed to pop up out of nowhere a few weeks ago, offering insanely expensive conversions to turn modern vehicles into retro supercars, namely the Ferrari 250 GTO and the Ferrari 412i.

The previous two models caught our attention immediately with their beauty, and now Ares has a new concept called Project Wami; unfortunately, we don’t think it’s gone as well.

Project Wami is supposed to be a recreation of the 1956 Maserati A6CGS Spyder with body by Frua, but instead, it looks like the details of that car were just Photoshopped onto a Miata.

The face looks awkward and misshapen, the side pipes are too modern-looking for a roadster of this era, and the convertible top looks like it was taken directly off of a BMW Z4.

The interior is not much better, especially because the rendering shows three pedals but doesn’t show a gearshift lever. Maybe somebody should get out the “clone” tool again and fix that.

Once again there are hints of Miata everywhere, including the overused Nardi wood steering wheel. The instrument cluster also throws back to the A6GCS but looks pretty cheesy here with the engine-turned aluminum panel and fake Jaeger gauges. One photo of the seats actually looks like it was meant to be for a WikiHow series.

And then there are the wheels. Oh, God, why did they put those wheels on it? 1980s Buicks would like their fake wire-wheel covers back, please. The original never had white walls either, as that was an American trait that the Europeans did not implement except in extreme cases.

Ares says it will be made of lightweight and strong materials such as handcrafted aluminum, carbon fibre, and leather, which means it won’t be cheap either. The release date hasn’t been discussed, and neither has the powertrain or the car it’s based on.

“When it comes to fruition Project Wami will be the finest bespoke roadster and a true testament to Ares Design’s painstaking eye for detail,” Ares promises. We loved their last few designs, so hopefully, they take another stab, or three, at this one.

Source: Driving

October 29, 2018